• Where It All Started

    Phil Robertson made a decision to turn down a career in the NFL because he didn’t love the game. He was great at throwing a football but his heart was in the outdoors with dreams of making his livelihood doing what he loved, hunting and fishing. He has always said the reasons for success with Duck Commander duck calls were: a good idea, hard work, and Divine intervention. Prior to the first duck call being built for sale in 1972, Phil tinkered with many duck calls during duck seasons due to...

  • Classic Commander — The Original Duck Commander Call

    The first two thousand DC-200 (now known as the Classic Commander) were built in 1972. Phil contracted his design to a local woodworker to make the barrels and tone boards. He mainly traded fresh fish for the woodwork and used his commercial fishing operation to fund the duck call venture. The reeds were assembled by hand with a drill and a hammer was used to connect his new double reed system. It was Phil’s dad that later came up with the idea of a dimple in between the reeds to prevent the...

  • The Wood Duck

    Contrary to popular belief among duck hunters, Wood Ducks can be called. Based on observation of Wood Ducks in the wild, it was determined that Wood Ducks have sitting sounds and flying sounds. The flying sounds are never made by Wood Ducks on the water and vice versa.

    Since this is true, Phil began a quest to create the first Wood Duck call that could mimic the flying and sitting sounds of Wood Ducks. Through trial and error, and maybe Divine intervention, a Wood Duck call prototype...

  • 6 In 1 Whistle

    With all ducks, the hen orates some sort of quack or growl while the drake vocalizes a whistle or buzz type sound.

    One Christmas morning the Robertsons were gathered at Phil and Miss Kay’s, as is their custom, and a strange occurrence produced the now famous multi-purpose, 6 in 1 whistle. The Robertson family is quite numerous and despite the commotion of eating, gift-giving, and story-telling, Phil urged everyone to be silent. As the chaos slowly subsided it left one distinct...

  • The Duck Picker — Phil’s Favorite Call

    The quack of a real Mallard does not echo. As duck call builders we describe this phenomenon as a ‘flat’, ‘nasally’ sound. Some scientists claim a ducks quack actually does echo but it is an ‘auditory illusion’, meaning the quack echoes just nothing hears it. Through the years Duck Commander has invented many calls that produced this non-echo flat sound. The frustration was that these calls were difficult to operate—especially for beginners —and required a lot of skill, practice, and air-...

  • The Gadwall

    Gadwall ducks have always been viewed by hunters as a bit unpredictable, erratic, and hard to call. There have been jokes from the Robertsons that the Gadwall is the ‘crazy Uncle Si’ of the duck family. The truth about Gadwalls is they are unique—the drakes do most of the talking. The Gadwall hen will do a three note, high pitch hail call much like a mallard hen, but the buzz sounds of the drake are way more prevalent in the wild. The Gadwall call came about one day in the duck blind when...

  • Triple Threat

    One of the fascinating facts about mallard hens is that they are all a bit different in tone and cadence when they quack. With all Duck Commander calls the tone and pitch of the various models of mallard hen calls come from years of listening to different sounding mallards. For whatever reason, different tones are more effective from day to day in ever changing weather conditions of a hunting season. Steve Schultz from Washington State has been a lifelong friend of the Robertson family. He...